The STRANGEST and Most EFFECTIVE Way to Learn CONDITIONAL SENTENCES

Conditional sentences practice
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Have you been struggling with conditional sentences? ME TOO! ?‍♀️
Conditional 0, conditional 1, 2 and 3. Mixed conditionals, confusing conditionals. So many options, and most of them don’t make any sense! ?

Well, in this video I explain conditionals in a new way, and while it may not be conventional… it might finally make sense.
(In a strange way. But hey, there are stranger things than that.)

I’ll discuss the 3 main conditionals in English and share with you my method to practice them so you can use conditionals without second-guessing yourself.

The main idea here is repetition. When we repeat things, they stick, and they become a habit.

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8 Comments on “The STRANGEST and Most EFFECTIVE Way to Learn CONDITIONAL SENTENCES”

  1. Hi, Hadar! Thank you so much for this lesson! For me it was rational explanation of this mess with tenses in conditionals two and three. It is third conditional that so difficult to master for me. And please, if you’ll have an opportunity, make a lesson about mixed conditionals.

  2. Hi Hadar
    thank you for your amazing way of explaining conditionals. the third conditional is the most challenging one. I want to ask you to explain all kind of perfect tenses too especially past perfect continuous and future perfect continuous. thanks a lot.

  3. Hello Hadar,
    I would love to know and I’m so curious about your fluency & how did you get to this level as a native speaker!
    I know is wasn’t a piece of cake to achieve this stage of learning a language!
    I appreciate it if you share the secret!
    Thank you!

    1. Hello Hadar,
      I would love to know and I’m so curious about your fluency, please how did you get to this speaking level as a native speaker!
      I know it wasn’t a piece of cake to achieve this stage of learning a language!
      I appreciate it if you share the secret!
      Thank you!

  4. This is an amazing lesson and great way to remind the three category conditional sentence. You are always great idle to me and I’m a die hard fan of you. However I have a little confusion on 3rd conditional statement on your lesson. For instance “If I had gone, I would have gotten to see her”. In this statement I am confused on the word “gone” – it is Past participle or we say V3. Actually what it will be ? Is it will v2 or v3 ? (Went or Gone).
    Please let my confusion clear.

  5. Please, attach this correction to the former comment where I made a stupid eye-slipping in the 2nd sentence: “You know, in my early childhood…”. Thank you.

  6. Dear Hadar ! I like your video really, very, very much ! You no, in my early childhood (like most of the children) I contracted a disease: the “information-tropism”. (Excuse me: other word doesn’t come to me.)(The society “cures” this disease later in most of the children – unfortunately.) So, I became an inquiring man and an “omnivorous” reader. Just at present I have on my desk the famous and nice book of Willard Van Orman Quine, entitled as, “Methods of Logic.” Its 3rd chapter is the Conditional. Of course, I’m not an expert either in Logic or in the relationship between Logic and Linguistics. I guess, you are. Nevertheless, I can see that your valuable system is as clear as the treatise in Quine’s book. So, as your student I thank you for your video and as a one-time brain researcher I congratulate ! Laszlo

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